What Is The Key to Getting Your Music In Film or TV?

Movie Clapper BoardIf you and your band write good songs, in any style, there is more opportunity than ever to get that music placed in some form of media. The fact is that media has expanded and now touches every part of our daily lives. Once upon a time the TV and Movie Theatres were the only avenues for visual entertainment. Those days are long gone and the dawn of a new era is providing unlimited opportunity for anyone with talent and good music.

People are watching as much "TV" on their cell phones and lap tops as they are on actual TV sets. They're hearing as music on commercial web sites and video games as they are on radio. The times are changing and a gigantic door is being pushed open.

The amount of movies, commercials, video games and TV shows being produced every day is staggering. Everyone of these productions require music and every one of these productions present opportunity for independent artist to gain exposure and profit from their work.

There are a number of keys to successful music placement. For an independent artist to secure placement of their music in media requires more than luck. It requires knowledge, skill and, above all, quality music.

We'll define the keys to successful music placement in this article but don't stop here. There is plenty to know about this industry and the more you know the more likely you are to succeed.

 

Know The Project

Many different films and TV shows have various musical themes running through them. A car driving down the street in a LA beach scene might have some hip-hop or a club scene may have some electronica and big beats blasting in the background. Still, common sense tells you that a movie taking place during the turn of the century isn't going to be using alternative industrial music and you proberbly won't be hearing any punk music either. There are certain times where there maybe an exception, but for the most part this rule is pretty reliable.

 

Have The Goods

Increase your odds of placement by having good songs that are WELL recorded. Creating a great song is no easy task. It's takes taste, musicians ship and senseablity. However, once you've done that, you need to assure that it's recorded well. Levels, the use of digital sounds, and mastering are all important parts of creating a well rounded product. You could have the best song in the world, but if it isn't well recorded it's not getting placed.

 

It's All in The Packaging

Music supervisors are busy people but they DO listen to music that is sent to them. However, you need to make their job easier. Put a post it note on the outside of the CD and list the feel and subject matter of the tracks.

For example....

  1.  Track 1. Style- Upbeat pop rock / Keywords- surfing beach life
  2.  Track 2. Style- Heavy driving rock / Keyword- loosing a loved one

Additionally, make sure the spine of your CD has your band (artist) name and defines your style. If you're a composer with a large catalog send a couple of CD's that showcase the different styles you've crafted, each CD in a certain genre.

Last but not least, remember to put your contact info on the post it note, and on the CD itself, or at least the liner notes. One sheets get lost. By assuring music supervisor can access all the information they need in one location you increase your odds of placement.

Grant it, this is just a snap shot of the process but the above listed are easy "keys" to successful music placement. By providing great songs that are well recorded, and packaging the material in away that is easy to reference you're well on your way to success.

Sync up, Be Heard!

Brent

Discuss this article in our Music Forum.

 

About Brent McCrossen

brent_mccrossenBrent McCrossen is co-founder and President of Audiosocket, a creatively-led music licensing agency based in Seattle.

Audiosocket represent music for placement in Film, TV, Advertising, Video Games and Web / Mobile media.

www.audiosocketmusic.com

All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Contact Brent McCrossen

Jazz is smooth and cool. Jazz is rage. Jazz flows like water. Jazz never seems to begin or end. Jazz isn't methodical, but jazz isn't messy either. Jazz is a conversation, a give and take. Jazz is the connection and communication between musicians. Jazz is abandon.”
Nat Wolff